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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel found in the catalog.

Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel

Glyne A. Griffith

Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel

by Glyne A. Griffith

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Press University of the West Indies in Kingston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Imperialism in literature.,
  • West Indian literature (English) -- Criticism, Textual.,
  • West Indian literature (English) -- History and criticism.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGlyne A. Griffith.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR9210 .G74 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxiii, 147 p. ;
    Number of Pages147
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21709873M
    ISBN 109766400121

    The West Indian Novel Instructor: Rennie Gonsalves e-mail: [email protected] this response will constitute the beginning of our discussion of the book. Deconstruction, Imperialism, and the West Indian Novel, The Press UWI, Wilson Harris. The implicit link between white women and "the dark races" recurs persistently in nineteenth-century English fiction. Imperialism at Home examines the metaphorical use of race by three nineteenth-century women novelists: Charlotte Bront, Emily Bront, and George Eliot. Susan Meyer argues that each of these domestic novelists uses race relations as a metaphor through which4/5.

    In , shortly after the United States won its independence, George Washington personally asked Pierre Charles L’Enfant—a young French artisan turned American revolutionary soldier who gained many friends among the Founding Fathers—to design the new nation's capital. Glyne A. Griffith’s challenging Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel (Kingston: Press University of the West Indies, ). Google Scholar Frontiers of Caribbean Literature in English, edited by Frank Birbalsingh (Macmillan/Warwick Centre for Caribbean Studies, ), consists primarily of interviews with writers from the.

    He is the author of The BBC and the Development of Anglophone Caribbean Literature, and Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of West Indian Literature (JWIL). Abstract Title | "Henry Swanzy and Literary Radio Broadcast in Ghana, - . Pages in category "Novels about colonialism" The following 12 pages are in this category, out of 12 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().


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Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel by Glyne A. Griffith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Deconstruction imperialism and the West Indian novel. [Glyne A Griffith] -- For review see: Sue N. Greene, in New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, no. 1 & 2 (); p. "Without empire there is no prose fiction." Edward W. Said (Lecture, 23 June at Dartmouth College, N.H.) Although the birth of the West Indian novel was itself a nominal act of resistance against limiting representations of West Indian personhood, the particular nature of narrative representation revealed in the individual West Indian novel determines its status as ideologically anti.

New West Indian Guide/Nieuwe West Indische Gids vol. 71 no. 1 & 2 () Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel. Glyne A. Griffith. Kingston: The Press - University of the West Indies, xxiii + pp. (Paper J$EC$£, US$ ) Sue N. Greene Department of English Towson State University. He is a scholar and teacher of Anglophone Caribbean literature and literary criticism.

He is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel; co-editor, with Linden Lewis, imperialism and the West Indian novel book Color, Hair and Bone: Race in the Twenty-First Century; and Associate Editor of Cited by: 1. Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel By Glyne A.

Griffith University of the West Indies Press, Read preview Overview Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism: From the Revolution to World War II By John Carlos Rowe Oxford University Press, He is a scholar and teacher of Anglophone Caribbean literature and literary criticism.

He is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel; co-editor, with Linden Lewis, of Color, Hair and Bone: Race in the Twenty-First Century; and Associate Editor of Brand: Palgrave Macmillan.

He is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel (UWI Press), and The BBC and the Development of Anglophone Caribbean Literature, (Palgrave Macmillan).

He serves on the editorial collective of the Journal of West Indian Literature (JWIL). Leah Rosenberg. He serves as co-editor of the Journal of West Indian Literature. He is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism, and the West Indian Novel (), editor of Caribbean Cultural Identities () and co-editor of Color, Hair, and Bone: Race in the 21st Century ().

Barbados: The Press - University of the West Indies; Toronto: ECW Press, pp.-Sue N. Greene, Glyne A. Griffith, Deconstruction, imperialism and the West Indian novel.

Kingston: The Press - University of the West Indies, xxiii + pp.-Donald R. Hill, Peter Manuel,Caribbean currents: Caribbean music from Rumba to Reggae. // Deconstruction, Imperialism & the West Indian Novel;, p A list of books related to West Indian novels is presented which include "Imperialism: Part Two of the Origins of Totalitarianism," by Hannah Arendt, "Culture and Anarchy: An Essay in Political and Social Criticism," by Matthew Arnold and edited by lan Gregor and "The Dialogic.

Glyne Griffith is associate professor of English at Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. He is the author of Deconstruction Imperialism and the West Indian Novel (), and is completing a book on Henry Swanzy and the BBC “Caribbean Voices” radio program. He has done extensive research on West Indian literary luminaries such as Edward Baugh, George Lamming, Kamau Brathwaite and V.S.

Naipaul. Professor Griffith is the author of Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel (), the co-editor of Color, Hair and Bone: Race in the Twenty-First Century () and Caribbean Cultural.

Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel (Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, ). pps. i (Reviews: Sue N. Greene in New West Indian Guide/Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 1&2 () pps.

and Patricia Joan Saunders in Trinidad and Tobago Review 7&8 (June ) pps. 1&5). Co-Edited Book. Deconstruction involves the close reading of texts in order to demonstrate that any given text has irreconcilably contradictory meanings, rather than being a unified, logical whole.

As J. Hillis Miller, the preeminent American deconstructionist, has explained in an essay entitled Stevens’ Rock and Criticism as Cure (), “Deconstruction.

The Postcolonial Indian Novel in English xiii Indian novel in English in not just discourses of postcoloniality but the novel at large by drawing on the work of scholars like Franco Moretti and Milan Kundera.

It has been my privilege to read this book and write this preface for my colleague in. Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel. Kingston, Jamaica: U of the West Indies P, Hall, Stuart. "The Formation of a Diasporic Intellectual: An Interview with Stuart Hall by Kuan-Hsing Chen." Stuart Hall: Critical Dialogues in Cultural Studies.

Eds. David Morley and Chen Kuan-Hsing. London: Routledge, Jung. Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel Glyne A.

Griffith US$18 (s) Paper Out of Order. Anthony Winkler and White West Indian Writing Kim Robinson-Walcott US$27 (s) Paper Philosophy in the West Indian Novel Earl McKenzie US$22 (s) Paper Cascade A Novel Barbara Lalla.

Deconstruction, Imperialism And The West Indian Novel UWI Press Deconstruction, Imperialism And The West Indian Novel UWI Press $ Depression to Decolonisation Barclays Bank (DCO) in the West Indies, 1 The Caribbean People Third Edition Book 3 Nelson Thornes Secondary Books.

Deconstruction, Imperialism And The West Indian Novel UWI Press Deconstruction, Imperialism And The West Indian Novel UWI Press $ $ Depression to Decolonisation Barclays Bank (DCO) in the West Indies, 1 The Caribbean People Third Edition Book 3 Nelson Thornes Secondary Books.

The West Indian novel and its background [Ramchand, Kenneth] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The West Indian novel and its backgroundAuthor: Kenneth Ramchand.

Listopia > Imperialism Book Lists. Best Non-fiction American History Books. 1, books — 2, voters Best Non-fiction War Books. 1, books — 1, voters Africa (fiction and nonfiction) 1, books — 1, voters Anarchist books. books — voters.The work demonstrates that many West Indian novels implicitly prefigured deconstructive practice as elucidated by Jacques Derrida.

In addition, it observes that the powerful hegemony of imperialism, as ubiquitous in the Caribbean as the tropical sunshine, needs to be included in any aesthetic equation which focuses on the West Indian novel.Three Women's Texts and a Critique of Imperialism Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak Critical Inquiry, (Autumn ), {} It should not be possible to read nineteenth-century British literature without remembering that imperialism, understood as England's social mission, was a crucial part of the cultural representation of England to the English.